Mitchell Warren – Final Project

December 10, 2009 1 comment
The Warrens

The Warrens

Generations

Generations

Grandpa's Lowrider

Grandpa's Lowrider

'Shoes

'Shoes

Model?

Model?

Yes.  I think so.

Yes. I think so.

Receding

Receding

Dash

Dash

Egress

Egress

Loner

Loner

What's Left

What's Left

JD

JD

Final Destination

Final Destination

These pictures were all taken over Thanksgiving break, and highlight several areas around my grandparents’ house.  These were all very fun to shoot, and required minimal edits.  Enjoy!

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Final Project Jackie Chavez

December 7, 2009 1 comment

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Holly Fredrickson’s Final 10

December 7, 2009 1 comment

Rather than bore you with my crappy photos from the semester all over again, I thought I would show you a different side of photography:

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket

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Final three Web site reviews

December 7, 2009 Leave a comment

For my last three web site reviews, I compared three different “best of” photo sites.

The first one, ( http://fiveprime.org/flickr_hvmnd.cgi ) was the most unique because it focused more on artistic photography and was a compilation of favorite photos on Flickr. This best of list spans multiple pages and a variety of subjects – scenery, portraits and stills were all present in force. There really seemed to be no particular guidelines for the list, in fact – it really did seem to be based simply on popularity. I loved the variety and quality present, but wish the compilers of this particular list had organized it better.

The second one, ( http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2008/12/the_year_2008_in_photographs_p.html ) is more of a photo-journalism list, and actually covers the best photos of 2008. The list is extensive, and I appreciated that all of the photos were on a single page, and displayed at a decent resolution. No thumbnails! Another neat feature this site had that the others lacked, was a simple system to protect viewers from sensitive subject matter. Two photos, one featuring an injured and bloody man, the other the body of a small child, were blacked out with simple white text explaining that the photos might be objectionable, and to click on them to make them appear. I thought this was a great, non-intrusive way to block sensitive photos.

The last site, ( http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/12/photogalleries/best-news-photos-2008/photo12.html ) was by National Geographic and also covered the best journalistic photos of 2008. I was surprised that there was practically no overlap between this list and the last one, except for one photo, and it happened to be the one of the bloody man that was blacked out in the previous list. National Geographic had no such measure in place, and I found the design of their list rather disappointing. Photos are not automatically displayed at a decent size, and there is only one photo per page – nice because you get a couple paragraphs of explanation per picture, but bad if the viewer as a short attention span or slow internet connection speed.

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Tonya Samson’s final project

December 7, 2009 Leave a comment

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Tonya Samson’s Final Project

December 7, 2009 Leave a comment
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Article Reviews: #8 – 10

December 7, 2009 Leave a comment

http://www.megalongcat.com/design-resources/video-game-photography-wipeout-hd-ushers-in-a-new-trend/

This article was great because it took a look at video games as a possible medium for photography – something I think a lot of people tend to overlook. It talks about how some games include built-in photo taking functions, and that this kind of utility is becoming more common. The author posts some examples of picture he took with the utility, and the results are definitely impressive. I wanted to get this article in, because my final project will likely be a series of 10 screen shots I took in a video game I’ve been playing recently.

http://compsimgames.about.com/cs/firsttimehere/ht/takescreenshot.htm

This very brief, simply About.com article is a great introduction in the most basic ways of taking screen shots. I would argue that it is a bit dated now, since most people have graphics editing programs and they usually have some kind of screen capture option. The method documented in the article mostly focuses on the primitive “Print Screen” technique. Most computer keyboard include the “PrtScn” key, and this key when hit, will save a snapshot of what was on screen the moment it was pressed. This data is usually only saved to the computer’s clipboard, and still needs to be pasted into a graphics program and saved.

http://www.wfu.edu/~matthews/misc/graphics/formats/formats.html

This was a great breakdown of the various digital image file types. I was only vaguely aware of a few of them before reading this, and the article certainly has made me rethink some of my habits when saving images. The article covers everything from lossless, number of colors and file size and gives examples to show the difference in quality. Interestingly, the author of this article treats the Jpeg file type with more respect than a lot of die-hard photographers I’ve known. The author acknowledges the superiority of Tiff files, but argues that for its size, Jpegs are a viable option for photographers, and that its rampant popularity proves that it does something right.

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